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Dave's ACT: ABORIGINAL GRINDING GROOVES - VIDEO

2010-11-9  "The grinding grooves are located on an area of exposed flat rock, up-slope from the two eucalypt trees. Aboriginal people used this area extensively for grinding stones

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Aboriginal grinding stone, Aboriginal people have shaped ...

Aboriginal usage, tool manufacture. Physical description. A large rock of generally oval shape and with a number of flatish surfaces and hole indentations which were identified by archaeologist Dr Joanna Freslov 2.6.2008 as being used by Aboriginal people as a grinding or tool-sharpening stone.

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Alyawarre Country: The grinding stone NFSA

2021-10-12  Grinding stones were used to crush leaves and bark to make medicine, or soft rocks and clays to make pigment for rock art and other decorations. The clip indicates that there was conflict between Aboriginal people and European pastoralists and that some pastoralists shot Indigenous people or placed them in chains when they speared cattle for food.

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Grinding stone - The Aboriginal Object Collection at ...

In the video Sharing a Collection David Lovett (Gunditj Mirring) explains how this grinding stone has multiple uses: one side to grind seeds and make flour, the other to make fire.. This type of grinding stone is known as a doughnut grinding slab. The Dunkeld District Historical Museum and members of the local Aboriginal communities have worked together to research and register the Dunkeld ...

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Grindstones - The Australian Museum

This grinding stone is 40 cm long and 35 cm wide with a height of 10 cm and is made from sandstone, which has a rough surface for grinding. The top stone is made from a hard smooth river cobble. This object was collected from Marra Station on the Darling River and donated to the Australian Museum prior to 1941. E49213.

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Aboriginal sites are an important part of the heritage of ...

2018-8-22  “This is the only known place where a complete assemblage of ceremonial grinding stones have been left undisturbed on Swan River Country. It is part of a wider sacred site complex that includes Susannah Brook (ID 640), the Ancestral Owl Stone (ID 26057), Herne Hill Ochre (ID 3433), Susannah Brook Waugal Stone

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Aboriginal Culture

2017-2-25  Upper and lower grinding stones made from basalt, used to grind vegetable, nut and seed foods. Cedar Creek, north Queensland, circa 1912. In this region, grindstones about 60cm long and 30 cm wide were kept in every hut. When people moved camp, they left behind the heavy lower stone, but took the top stone with them.

More

Identifying Aboriginal Sites - Aboriginal Heritage

The dough was then kneaded and cooked to make a type of damper, which was an essential part of the Aboriginal diet. Grinding stones / dishes and patches are commonly found in arid areas, but can be found anywhere. Grooves are located on flat rock

More

'Priceless' Aboriginal artefacts welcomed home to Country ...

2021-10-29  The collection of artefacts returned to Country includes ceremonial pieces, axe heads, and grinding stones. Tamworth Local Aboriginal Land Council (TLALC) Chair

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Aboriginal Heritage Identification Guide

2020-1-28  • Stone or bone artefacts • Grinding stones • Charcoal from cooking • Occasionally, burials of Aboriginal Ancestral Remains. Coastal middens Coastal middens can be found in sheltered areas, dunes, coastal scrub and woodlands, exposed cliff-tops with good vantage points, and coastal wetlands, inlets, bays and river mouths. In some areas, . .

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Dave's ACT: ABORIGINAL GRINDING GROOVES - VIDEO

2010-11-9  "The grinding grooves are located on an area of exposed flat rock, up-slope from the two eucalypt trees. Aboriginal people used this area extensively for grinding stones into sharp edges for use as axes. There are some 50 shallow grooves worn

More

Alyawarre Country: The grinding stone NFSA

2021-10-12  Grinding stones were used to crush leaves and bark to make medicine, or soft rocks and clays to make pigment for rock art and other decorations. The clip indicates that there was conflict between Aboriginal people and European pastoralists and that some pastoralists shot Indigenous people or placed them in chains when they speared cattle for food.

More

Aboriginal grinding stone, Aboriginal people have shaped ...

Aboriginal usage, tool manufacture. Physical description. A large rock of generally oval shape and with a number of flatish surfaces and hole indentations which were identified by archaeologist Dr Joanna Freslov 2.6.2008 as being used by Aboriginal people as a grinding or tool-sharpening stone.

More

Grinding stone - The Aboriginal Object Collection at ...

In the video Sharing a Collection David Lovett (Gunditj Mirring) explains how this grinding stone has multiple uses: one side to grind seeds and make flour, the other to make fire.. This type of grinding stone is known as a doughnut grinding slab. The Dunkeld District Historical Museum and members of the local Aboriginal communities have worked together to research and register the Dunkeld ...

More

Grinding and pounding stones from Cuddie Springs and

The grinding stones are present in six analytical archaeological levels spanning at least 30,000 years, and about forty of these implements have been analysed (Figures 1-4). These artefacts have

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Identifying Aboriginal Sites - Aboriginal Heritage

The dough was then kneaded and cooked to make a type of damper, which was an essential part of the Aboriginal diet. Grinding stones / dishes and patches are commonly found in arid areas, but can be found anywhere. Grooves are located on flat rock

More

Aboriginal Culture

2017-2-25  Upper and lower grinding stones made from basalt, used to grind vegetable, nut and seed foods. Cedar Creek, north Queensland, circa 1912. In this region, grindstones about 60cm long and 30 cm wide were kept in every hut. When people moved camp, they left behind the heavy lower stone, but took the top stone with them.

More

Food or fibercraft? Grinding stones and Aboriginal use of ...

2018-2-25  The grinding stone is an indurated sandstone with two large grinding grooves on the upper surface (Surface 1), which range in depth from 29 mm (Groove 2) and 32 mm (Groove 1) . The lower surface of the grinding stone (Surface 2) has not been ground. The tool appears to have been cleaned prior to storage at the museum. 5.1. Methods

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Fact sheet: Aboriginal axe-grinding grooves First ...

Axe-grinding grooves are oval shaped indentations in sandstone outcrops. Find out how to spot and protect them.

More

'Priceless' Aboriginal artefacts welcomed home to Country ...

2021-10-29  The collection of artefacts returned to Country includes ceremonial pieces, axe heads, and grinding stones. Tamworth Local Aboriginal Land Council (TLALC) Chair

More

Dave's ACT: ABORIGINAL GRINDING GROOVES - VIDEO

2010-11-9  "The grinding grooves are located on an area of exposed flat rock, up-slope from the two eucalypt trees. Aboriginal people used this area extensively for grinding stones into sharp edges for use as axes. There are some 50 shallow grooves worn

More

Alyawarre Country: The grinding stone NFSA

2021-10-12  Grinding stones were used to crush leaves and bark to make medicine, or soft rocks and clays to make pigment for rock art and other decorations. The clip indicates that there was conflict between Aboriginal people and European pastoralists and that some pastoralists shot Indigenous people or placed them in chains when they speared cattle for food.

More

Aboriginal grinding stone, Aboriginal people have shaped ...

Aboriginal usage, tool manufacture. Physical description. A large rock of generally oval shape and with a number of flatish surfaces and hole indentations which were identified by archaeologist Dr Joanna Freslov 2.6.2008 as being used by Aboriginal people as a grinding or tool-sharpening stone.

More

Identifying Aboriginal Sites - Aboriginal Heritage

The dough was then kneaded and cooked to make a type of damper, which was an essential part of the Aboriginal diet. Grinding stones / dishes and patches are commonly found in arid areas, but can be found anywhere. Grooves are located on flat rock

More

Food or fibercraft? Grinding stones and Aboriginal use of ...

2018-2-25  The grinding stone is an indurated sandstone with two large grinding grooves on the upper surface (Surface 1), which range in depth from 29 mm (Groove 2) and 32 mm (Groove 1) . The lower surface of the grinding stone (Surface 2) has not been ground. The tool appears to have been cleaned prior to storage at the museum. 5.1. Methods

More

Grinding stone (2) - The Aboriginal Object Collection at ...

In the video Sharing a Collection David Lovett (Gunditj Mirring) explains how this grinding stone has multiple uses: one side to grind seeds and make flour, the other to make fire.. This type of grinding stone is known as a doughnut grinding slab. The Dunkeld District Historical Museum and members of the local Aboriginal communities have worked together to research and register the Dunkeld ...

More

Niloufer's Kitchen: The Ancient Art of Masala Grinding

2014-4-10  The ancient art of grinding daily 'masala' is one of these. Most homes in the subcontinent had and many still have their indigenous stone grinders in some shape, size or form. The "Masala Stone" or Masala no Pathar, as we refer to it in Gujarati, was

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Fact sheet: Aboriginal axe-grinding grooves First ...

Axe-grinding grooves are oval shaped indentations in sandstone outcrops. Find out how to spot and protect them.

More

'Priceless' Aboriginal artefacts welcomed home to Country ...

2021-10-29  The collection of artefacts returned to Country includes ceremonial pieces, axe heads, and grinding stones. Tamworth Local Aboriginal Land Council (TLALC) Chair

More

The world’s first baker: Australian Indigenous innovation ...

2016-6-28  Why don’t we know about the oldest grinding stones in the world, found in Australia, or the crops cultivated by Aboriginal Australians? Bruce Pascoe is helping change that. This article was first published in Issue 136 (July–September 2016) of

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